Technion USA - Winter 2016-2017 - page 18-19

Maria Khoury Salameh
Ph.D. student in the Korin Lab,
Cardiovascular Nanomedicine Engineering
Ever since childhood, I’ve wanted to
study at the Technion. I studied physics and
electronics in high school in Haifa, and it
was a natural step for me to apply to the
Technion. I chose biomedical engineering
and felt right at home as soon as I entered.
I felt that I belonged. The more I studied,
the more I discovered that knowledge was
unlimited. At the same time, I learned to
believe in myself. This humbling experience
motivated me to study more and to work
harder.
I had a great advisor, a Ph.D. researcher
named Netanel Korin. But while I con-
tinued for an M.Sc. in biomedical
engineering, he left for a postdoc at
Harvard. After my master’s, I worked at
the Faculty of Medicine then decided to
continue for a Ph.D. At that point, Prof.
Korin was back at the Technion as a faculty
member and I became the first Ph.D.
student in his newly established lab.
Professor Eyal Gottlieb
Director, Laura and Isaac Perlmutter
Metabolomics Center, Technion Integrated
Cancer Center (inaugurated in November
2016), Rappaport Faculty of Medicine
I was going to be a veterinarian, but when
I got a taste of research I was instantly hooked.
I got into cancer research during my master’s
and doctoral degrees in the early ’90s. My
journey then led to postdoc appointments at
the University of Chicago and the University of
Pennsylvania, where I began to focus on cancer
metabolism.
There was great interest in the U.K. in cancer
research. I landed a position at the Beatson
Institute in Glasgow, pioneering cancer
metabolism—a combination of chemistry and
molecular biology. It was a good decision,
personally and professionally. But we Israelis
always keep our eyes open for options to come
back home.
Two years ago, my son decided to return to
Israel. This took place just as Professors
Aaron Ciechanover and Ze’ev Ronai invited
me to establish a metabolomics center at the
Technion. I was delighted for the opportunity
to find something I believed in and to return to
my hometown.
Yoram Cedar
Technion Guardian, Co-Founder, Omega
Point; former EVP and CTO, SanDisk
Corp.; Technion B.Sc. and M.Sc.,
Electrical Engineering and Computer
Architecture
The Technion is my second home.
Growing up in Haifa, I frequently visited
the Technion campus, where my father,
Professor Israel Cederbaum, was a
pioneering member and Dean of the
Faculty of Electrical Engineering.
My childhood memories are filled with
faculty events and holiday celebrations.
My wife Zahava and I were married at
the Technion. For me and for my family,
the Technion was not only an academic
journey, it has been an amazing life
journey, and the faculty have been my
extended family.
The seeds for my career were planted
during my childhood and teenage years.
My summer fun was working at the
Technion Digital Design Lab, the first of
its kind in Israel. My love for electronics
and engineering started in those days. I
was fascinated by science and inspired
by technology and innovation. It was
my formative years at the Technion
that shaped my character, interests and
professional aspirations. My commitment
to the Technion and to Israel is long
lasting.
Nitzan Krinsky
Ph.D. student in the Interdisciplinary
Program for Biotechnology
As a biotech research undergraduate
student, I loved the lab life. Then I went into
the army and served for six years. At the end
of my service I had to decide whether to pursue
a military career or return to academia—a
big dilemma. I decided that continuing at the
Technion was a great opportunity for me. In
Professor Avi Schroeder’s research group,
we’re developing therapeutic particles which
serve as ‘factories’ capable of producing
medicine inside a patient’s body.
I still serve in the reserves, but my decision to
pursue my dream, to become a scientist, was
right for me. Lab work can be daunting when
things don’t work so easily. Which is why when
they do—it’s so amazing! You’ve been trying
to do something for weeks or even months, you
make a little change, try again, then one day
it does what it was supposed to do and you get
the result you were hoping for! It is a feeling
of great accomplishment.
Associate Professor
Simone Engelender
M.D. and Ph.D. from the Federal University of Rio de
Janeiro (Laboratory of Neurodegenerative Diseases–
Rappaport Faculty of Medicine)
We started dating when we were 13 and 14. We grew
up together in the same Brazilian Jewish community,
attended the same Zionist youth movement and studied
medicine at the same university. We did our Ph.D.s in the
same lab. We both chose research over practicing medicine
as we love innovation, and continued for postdocs at Johns
Hopkins. We both became neuroscientists, but our labs are
entirely separate. We immigrated to Israel 15 years ago
and have been at the Technion ever since.
Professor Herman Wolosker
M.D. and Ph.D. from the Federal University of Rio de
Janeiro (Laboratory of Molecular Neurosciences
Rappaport Faculty of Medicine) and Coordinator, Prince
Center for Neurodegenerative Disorders of the Brain
We both spoke at the same conference in Eilat. Whoever
wasn’t lecturing was in the pool with the kids (four and
one on the way). We are a sort of living experiment. We’re
the same age, with the exact same background, so we’re
perfectly positioned to see how society approaches women
differently. This certainly enriches both of us and improves
the way we educate the children.
TECHNION USA 2017
19
18
2017 TECHNION USA
There are so
many Faces of
the Technion.
Share your story
or read more at
I LOVED MILITARY SERVICE,
BUT I LOVE MY LAB EVEN MORE
FACES
of the
TECHNION
continued
A GREAT OPPORTUNITY
BROUGHT ME HOME
MARRIED TO THE TECHNION–
AND TO EACH OTHER
IT’S ALWAYS BEEN
THE TECHNION
GROWING UP AT
THE TECHNION
1,2-3,4-5,6-7,8-9,10-11,12-13,14-15,16-17 20-21,22-23,24-25,26-27,28
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