Trouble viewing this email? Click Here.

CONNECTIONS

April 2017

South Florida Beats Out the World

nationalenews1.jpg
(l to r) Katz Yeshiva Science Department Chair Mrs. Ellen Chait with students Michal Amar, Ty Kay, Tani Loskove, Noah Bernten, Max Davis, Josh Bernten and Dr. Yosef Wolf, who heads up the school’s STEM courses

Katz Yeshiva High School of South Florida won first prize in the Technion’s latest Rube Goldberg Machine competition. Encouraged by the popularity of previous Technion Rube Goldberg videos, which went viral, some 24 high schools around the world participated in the international challenge. This year’s theme was Earth Day. Katz Yeshiva was the only school in the U.S. to place in the top three.

Working out of a student’s garage, the winning team used recyclable materials and old toys to concoct a nearly one-minute-long chain reaction that illustrated the Earth Day themes of recycling and alternative energy sources.

READ MORE SHARE

MAKE A GIFT TO THE TECHNION FUND TODAY

The Technion is contributing to Israel and the global good in unprecedented ways. Help us ensure its continued advancement as a world-class institution of higher education.

LEARN MORE

Technion Gets High Scores for Diversity

nationalenews2.jpg
Technion Campus

In a thought-provoking CNBC commentary on college admissions, timed to coincide with the angst-filled month in which high school seniors across the U.S. receive their college acceptance (or rejection) letters, the Technion was the only university singled out for praise.

The CNBC article cites the Technion for its unique approach to diversity. In an effort to level an uneven playing field, top students and teachers from the Technion go into Arab villages to tutor high-schoolers in math and science, ensuring a good balance between Israelis and Arabs in its classrooms. The story notes that the Technion not only has more Arab students than other Israeli universities, but that they were admitted on merit, having fulfilled the same admissions requirements as every other student.

WATCH VIDEO SHARE

In-Flight Hydrogen Production Could Mean “Greener” Aircraft

nationalenews3.jpg
Dr. Shani Elitzur

Technion researchers, led by aerospace engineer Dr. Shani Elitzur, have found a safe, efficient way to produce hydrogen onboard an airplane that could be channeled into electrical energy for in-flight use. The breakthrough focuses on sparking a spontaneous and sustained chemical reaction between aluminum powder and water (fresh or waste), solving the problems associated with storing hydrogen. Among its many benefits, the technology would reduce C02 emissions, and generate heat that could be used for de-icing operations or warming up food in the galley.

READ MORE SHARE

Building Roads to Wirelessly Charge Your Car

nationalenews4.jpg
ElectRoad will retrofit existing roads with buried coils to inductively charge easily retrofitted electric vehicles. Photo credit: Courtesy

Technion alumnus Oren Ezer, co-founder of ElectRoad, is building and testing smart roads that would power electric cars wirelessly while they drive. The system works by installing copper-and-rubber electromagnetic strips in the asphalt, which are connected to a power converter on the side of the road that links to the city’s electric grid. The vehicles are then fitted underneath with a coil unit that receives the power.

READ MORE SHARE

Alumni Provide Security Against Car Hackers

nationalenews5.jpg
Photo credit: karambasecurity.com

The burgeoning Internet of Things (IoT) revolution means that nearly everything we use—from televisions and telephones to kitchen appliances and cars—is connected to the Internet. But with connectivity comes the need for security against hackers. Karamba Security, co-founded by Technion alumni David Barzilai and Assaf Harel, offers a cyber-security solution that secures a vehicle’s engine control unit by detecting and preventing all computer operations that deviate from the original factory settings.

READ MORE SHARE

“Sci-fi” Cancer Therapy Fights Brain Tumors

nationalenews6.jpg
Photo credit: www.cbsnews.com

A cap-like device that creates electric fields to fight cancer improved survival rates for the first time in more than a decade for people with deadly brain tumors, according to recent results from a large study. More than twice as many patients were alive five years after receiving the treatment, along with traditional chemotherapy, than those given chemo alone.

The device, Optune, was created by Technion Professor Emeritus Yoram Palti, who founded Novocure to develop Tumor Treating Fields—a completely different approach to cancer therapy. This innovative treatment creates low-intensity, alternating electric fields, that when applied at specific frequencies, can disrupt cancer cell division and cause cancer cell death.

READ MORE SHARE

JOIN US ON THE TECHNION WORLD TOUR

The second of three trips will visit New York City, home of the Jacobs Technion-Cornell Institute, in 2017. The third trip will visit China in 2018.

LEARN MORE
PRESS/MEDIA|PRIVACY POLICY|CONTACT|UPDATE PROFILE|SHARE|UNSUBSCRIBE
American Technion Society
55 East 59th Street New York, NY 10022
Tel: 212.407.6300
Fax: 212.753.2925
Email: info@ats.org
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -